Cute Gibbs sampling for rounded observations

I was attending a course of Bayesian Statistics where this problem showed up: There is a number of individuals, say 12, who take a pass/fail test 15 times. For each individual we have recorded the number of passes, which can go from 0 to 15. Because of confidentiality issues, we are presented with rounded-to-the-closest-multiple-of-3 data… Continue reading Cute Gibbs sampling for rounded observations

Less wordy R

The Swarm Lab presents a nice comparison of R and Python code for a simple (read 'one could do it in Excel') problem. The example works, but I was surprised by how wordy the R code was and decided to check if one could easily produce a shorter version. The beginning is pretty much the… Continue reading Less wordy R

If you have to use circles…

Stats Chat is an interesting kiwi site—managed by the Department of Statistics of the University of Auckland—that centers around the use and presentation of statistics in the media. This week there was an interesting discussion on one of those infographics that make you cringe: I understand the newspaper's need to grab our attention, as well… Continue reading If you have to use circles…

Revisiting homicide rates

A pint of R plotted an interesting dataset: intentional homicides in South America. I thought the graphs were pretty but I was unhappy about the way information was conveyed in the plots; relative risk should be very important but number of homicides is very misleading as it also relates to country population (this problem often… Continue reading Revisiting homicide rates

Plotting earthquake data

Since 4th September 2010 we have had over 2, 800 quakes (considering only magnitude 3+) in Christchurch. Quakes come in swarms, with one or few strong shocks, followed by numerous smaller ones and then the ocasional shock, creating an interesting data visualization problem. In our case, we have had swarms in September 2010, December 2010,… Continue reading Plotting earthquake data