notes in a shoebox

Quantum Forest

Category: teaching Page 9 of 10

R is a language

A commenter on this blog reminded me of one of the frustrating aspects faced by newbies, not only to R but to any other programming environment (I am thinking of typical students doing stats for the first time). The statement “R is a language” sounds perfectly harmless if you have previous exposure to programming. However, if you come from a zero-programming background the question is What do you really mean?

R, academia and the democratization of statistics

I am not a statistician but I use statistics, teach statistics and write about applications of statistics in biological problems.

Last week I was in this biostatistics conference, talking with a Ph.D. student who was surprised about this situation because I didn’t have any statistical training. I corrected “any formal training”. On the first day one of the invited speakers was musing about the growing number of “amateurs” using statistics—many times wrongly—and about what biostatisticians could offer as professional value-adding. Yes, he was talking about people like me spoiling the party.

On the (statistical) road, workshops and R

Things have been a bit quiet at Quantum Forest during the last ten days. Last Monday (Sunday for most readers) I flew to Australia to attend a couple of one-day workshops; one on spatial analysis (in Sydney) and another one on modern applications of linear mixed models (in Wollongong). This will be followed by attending The International Biometric Society Australasian Region Conference in Kiama.

I would like to comment on the workshops to look for commonalities and differences. First, both workshops heavily relied on R, supporting the idea that if you want to reach a lot of people and get them using your ideas, R is pretty much the vehicle to do so. It is almost trivial to get people to install R and RStudio before the workshop so they are ready to go. “Almost” because you have to count on someone having a bizarre software configuration or draconian security policies for their computer.

If you are writing a book on Bayesian statistics

This post is somewhat marginal to R in that there are several statistical systems that could be used to tackle the problem. Bayesian statistics is one of those topics that I would like to understand better, much better, in fact. Unfortunately, I struggle to get the time to attend courses on the topic between running my own lectures, research and travel; there are always books, of course.

Teaching with R: the tools

I bought an Android phone, nothing fancy just my first foray in the smartphone world, which is a big change coming from the dumb phone world(*). Everything is different and I am back at being a newbie; this is what many students feel the same time they are exposed to R. However, and before getting into software, I find it useful to think of teaching from several points of view, considering that there are several user cases:

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